OSX Spotlight – Filter “Safari history item” and mailboxes

Most folks browse the web and some do so often. This creates a history which Safari conveniently stores for future reference. The feature is especially useful when you go to “History -> Show All History”.

What isn’t so useful is searching for a file and receiving thousands of results for “Safari history item”. This shouldn’t be an issue because there is an option to remove “Safari” from Search Results, however, this option fails to remove Safari history items from Spotlight search results.

To disable Spotlight from searching “Safari history item”:

  • Open System Preferences, go to Spotlight and click on Privacy pane
  • open a new Finder window
  • browse to <home> /Library/Caches/Metadata/Safari
  • Drag and drop “History” folder from Finder to Privacy pane
  • Filtering Specific Mailboxes: browse to Library/Mail/
  • Find offending .imapbox, .mbox, or any other; drag and drop onto Privacy pane

As far as I can tell you can filter many of the Spotlight searches by adding any of the folders in Library/Caches/Metadata. Here is what my Privacy settings look like:

 

Spotlight Privacy Filter
Spotlight Privacy Filter

Hopefully you made it here and didn’t see this:

failed search

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OSX Spotlight – Filter “Safari history item” and mailboxes

Apple only poised for Enterprise

As I began working this evening I realized I haven’t backed up my laptop in a few months. In fact, three months ago I backed up to a system which recently crashed. I lost data and freaked out a little and losing my laptop hard disk right now would be bad. After hearing about someone’s laptop being stolen I can’t procrastinate any longer. So what am I going to do about it?

Well, after purchasing two 500GB USB drives and a Time Capsule, I’m going to connect some cables and CLICK FOUR TIMES. Then every month I’ll CLICK FOUR TIMES, swap out one of the 500GB “archive” drives, then take the other off site. For less than $500 and 52 clicks a year I will have “secure” historical backups of my laptop.

This does NOT happen in IT.

With a business of 5-50 employees and non-Apple systems, secure offsite backups will cost anywhere from $3-30k worth of software, hardware, media, and/or bandwidth. There are valid reasons for the costs, however, once a solution is in place you maybe looking at paying for a full time employee which will cost much more than four mouse clicks.

While seemingly far-fetched, there are few differences between backing up my laptop and backing up a business; let’s keep in mind that no matter how much data is involved, the process of securely backing up, storing, and restoring data is the same. The backup life-cycle consists of transferring data to offline media, archiving, restoring, and retention. Upfront costs are typically associated with how much data you have and the recurring cost correlates with your retention and archiving policies. What a business adds in complexity is gathering data for backup, as the data may reside on multiple servers and/or desktops. The second complexity a business adds maybe proprietary software which requires additional licensing to efficiently backup data without downtime.

Unfortunately at this time there isn’t a four click backup solution for IT in small or enterprise businesses. Backups are costly and complicated. Moreover, while you can deploy Time Machine for all Macs, not every machine is a Mac and servers typically run Windows or Linux. So, while Apple has done a great job of solving the task of backups by integrating the service into their OS for free, they have not solved what is still a significantly difficult task in IT. Apple is poised for the enterprise yet continues focusing on consumers. Considering all the new avenues Apple has ventured in the last five years — Aperture, AppleTV, iPhone w/Exchange support, iLife/FinalCut/Logic, iTunes, iWork, MobileMe, Shake, and Time Machine — I have to ask myself why Apple remains out of the enterprise?

Apple only poised for Enterprise